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Okay, I’m Outraged, Buddhist Student Insulted by Teacher

Okay, I’m Outraged, Buddhist Student Insulted by Teacher

Day after day, I am bombarded by evidence of stupidity and evil. I expose myself to this hail of slings and arrows by reading in my field, business ethics, each morning. This particular incident appears to be a public school, not a private, so not usually part of my endeavors. Nevertheless, sometimes an act is so cruel and bizarre as to give rise to anger on my part. This is one of them.

Please read the article below and see what you think.

This child is a sixth grader. The power contrast between an entire school and one child does not require any analysis on my part. Religious bullying is wrong. 

While ridiculing people’s religions may be okay inside another church’s Sunday school or other service, the public school is for all Americans of all religions. The freedom of religion guaranteed in this country protects all religions and is supposed to protect everyone from this kind of coercion.

I’m tired of talking to people who claim to speak from the Bible or the Constitution without reading either. I’m tired of people who claim that if you don’t share their beliefs, you should be on the next boat to somewhere you won’t annoy them. I’m tired of people taking the doctrines of Christ and using them to exercise this kind of cruelty.

James Pilant

School Allegedly Told Buddhist Student His Faith Is ‘Stupid’ & He Should Convert Or Switch Schools | ThinkProgress

via School Allegedly Told Buddhist Student His Faith Is ‘Stupid’ & He Should Convert Or Switch Schools | ThinkProgress.

From around the web.

From the web site, Tackling Bullying.

http://tacklingbullying.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/living-through-the-quint-quarrels/

According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, victims of long-term bullying often experience low self-esteem, difficulty in trusting others, a lack of assertiveness, aggression, difficulty in controlling anger, and isolation. Before I entered high school, I had encountered five separate incidences of in-school bullying. Each of these situations has demonstrated the impact of long-term bullying. It’s rare that I actually talk about my experiences with bullying. However, I do feel as if my stories need to be told to be an advocate for the voiceless.

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Thomas Friedman Gets Entitlements Wrong

Thomas Friedman Gets Entitlements Wrong

 

Sorry Kids, Thomas Friedman Is Not Very Good at Economics

 

http://www.cepr.net/index.php/blogs/beat-the-press/sorry-kids-thomas-friedman-is-not-very-good-at-economics

 

Many young people may have been mislead by Thomas Friedman’s column, titled “Sorry Kids: We Ate It All,” which implied that our children might somehow suffer because we are paying so much to seniors for Social Security and Medicare. The reality of course is that if our children and grandchildren do not enjoy much higher standards of living than do current workers and retirees then it will be because the rich have rigged the deck so that they can accrue most of the gains from economic growth.

 

I heartily agree with Dean Baker of the Center for Economic and Policy Research. The generational theft storyline has been running around for a while and it is both wrong and unconvincing. Let’s take me for instance, I have my form in the mail from the Social Security Administration telling me what to expect. If I wait all the way until I’m 70, I will receive, $1,440 a month. I’m a little curious? When did that become a princely sum? Is this the kind of money that will enable me to go the sand and surf of Hawaii or does it more look like I’m going to have trouble paying for a place to live and basic groceries. I’m leaning toward the latter conclusion. Even in Arkansas, 1,440 dollars a month is not going to pay for a mansion. I might add that I have been paying in on that all of my working life, so it’s not free as far as I am concerned.

 

Well, what about Medicare? Well, it’s obvious to me although not to Friedman, that medical patents are being abused, that not allowing prescription drugs to either be bargained for by the federal government or purchased overseas is creating dramatically high medical costs and there are a bundles of other good choices we have to reduce out medical costs instead of telling seniors, “It’s just too bad, you got old while Thomas Friedman was considered an expert.”

 

Where do these people get the gall to tell the great middle class to go without pensions and health care when they have expressed no willingness to fix the nation’s problems? Why do we have a system where capital gains is taxed at less than wages? Why do we have no financial transaction tax to discourage the speculation which has wrought havoc all over this nation and the world?

 

 

 

James Pilant

 

From around the web.

 

From the web site, Okieprogressive.

 

http://okieblog.wordpress.com/2013/05/29/social-security-and-medicare/

 

Social Security and Medicare are programs that are needed relevant and necessary!

 

The Difference Between Moral Hazard and God’s Grace (via Ethical Houston)

Moral Hazard is one of the more important concepts of our current economic situation. This is an intelligent, insightful article with a clear explanation of the phenomenon. I am a big believer in Christianity’s view of business ethics and here is a good one by a fine author. If you are an economics or business student, you will find useful material here.

James Pilant

The Difference Between Moral Hazard and God’s Grace   If corporations are considered to have most of the same rights as humans should they also be entitled to Grace? Last summer the Supreme Court decided that corporations had the right to make unlimited contributions to political candidates.  For a number of years labor unions have also been able to make contributions to political campaigns.  This ruling is just another incident where the law has held that corporations have many of the same rights … Read More

via Ethical Houston

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